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Sarina Wiegman


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Why does there need to be cross over, they are different games. 

 

I'm not against the principle in any way shape or form, but in the same way I always thought it strange that women's football has male managers, don't see why there needs to be a discussion.

 

For the women's game to grow, needs females to own it and excel in their sport. Not because they aren't good enough, but for the good of the women's game. 

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I think the argument that a woman can’t manage a mens team because she will potentially see players naked is a bit of silliness. It would just take the implementation of a few rules, like wearing towels or pants when outside the showers. It’s not like players stand around bôllock naked for hours and hours receiving coaching. 
 

The fact that many men coach women teams without issue proves it isn’t a real problem. 
 

The real problem is the attitude of the players. If they are open to it it would work. If they weren’t open to it it wouldn’t. At this stage I am not sure any teams higher in the league would be open to it and the pressure would be insane.

 

But things do change over time. Who would have imagined a Vegan club could be a thing? I’m sure we will see a few in the lower tiers in coming seasons. 
 

It will become normal  over time I’m sure, but it’s going to take ages and ages. 

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3 hours ago, Wednesday_Jack said:


Absolutely it wouldn’t!!
 

how would a female coach be able to walk into a make dressing room at various stages on match day for a start?? And vice versa for that matter!! 
 

I am over the moon for the England ladies and it’s great to see how far the game as developed but let just enjoy it for what it is…womens football and mens football.

 

it is and should be recognised in its own right, not on the back mens football!! 

 

Alot of teams in the mens game have female staff on their books working as physios so how is it different should the manager be female. And as said, some of the womens teams have men and the staff some of whom are the manager.

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20 minutes ago, striker said:

Why does there need to be cross over, they are different games. 

 

I'm not against the principle in any way shape or form, but in the same way I always thought it strange that women's football has male managers, don't see why there needs to be a discussion.

 

For the women's game to grow, needs females to own it and excel in their sport. Not because they aren't good enough, but for the good of the women's game. 

It is a very fair point that really for woman’s football to be a real success it needs to keep its own talent. But as it stands mens football is definitely seen as being a higher level, with more money and more opportunity. If I were a top woman’s coach I’m sure I’d want to be at least considered for a position in mens football.

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Just now, CircleSeven said:

It is a very fair point that really for woman’s football to be a real success it needs to keep its own talent. But as it stands mens football is definitely seen as being a higher level, with more money and more opportunity. If I were a top woman’s coach I’m sure I’d want to be at least considered for a position in mens football.

Fair point, agree and not against it all all in terms of gender.

 

I just think such huge strides have been made in the women's game, the point raised repeatedly that comparison to the men's game unfair as it's different. 

 

If that's the argument, and a reasonable  argument to make, easily accepted, it is important to retain talent. 

 

There will always be individuals who seek financial gain, but don't think it is necessary or would be a watershed moment.

 

I take Inspiration from darts, which needed that breakthrough and now has a women's tournament. That is throwing stuff a short distance, there isn't a particular physical advantage or disadvantage of gender, but now has a women's game. 

 

I don't think men's and women's games being separated are a bad thing, one doesn't diminish the other, just provides greater opportunity for more people to get involved in sport. 

 

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28 minutes ago, striker said:

Fair point, agree and not against it all all in terms of gender.

 

I just think such huge strides have been made in the women's game, the point raised repeatedly that comparison to the men's game unfair as it's different. 

 

If that's the argument, and a reasonable  argument to make, easily accepted, it is important to retain talent. 

 

There will always be individuals who seek financial gain, but don't think it is necessary or would be a watershed moment.

 

I take Inspiration from darts, which needed that breakthrough and now has a women's tournament. That is throwing stuff a short distance, there isn't a particular physical advantage or disadvantage of gender, but now has a women's game. 

 

I don't think men's and women's games being separated are a bad thing, one doesn't diminish the other, just provides greater opportunity for more people to get involved in sport. 

 

All fair comments. The main thing for me is your final statement. More opportunity for all in sport. The increase in popularity that the Euro win can generate should push the woman’s game into a new level. This can only be good. 
 

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2 hours ago, Daniele Giovanni said:

Because you're a GermanBird and you lost last night? 

 

I won because I have been supporting the England national teams since 2010.

(Never watched a German team live, but watched England several times at Wembley. Haven't watched a German game since 2010 on TV unless they played England)

 

(even my German boss said that I am not allowed into work, if England wins as he can't bear my grinning face)

 

 

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5 hours ago, Wednesday_Jack said:


Absolutely it wouldn’t!!
 

how would a female coach be able to walk into a make dressing room at various stages on match day for a start?? And vice versa for that matter!! 
 

I am over the moon for the England ladies and it’s great to see how far the game as developed but let just enjoy it for what it is…womens football and mens football.

 

it is and should be recognised in its own right, not on the back mens football!! 

It worked the other way around, when traditionaly men managed womens teams

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34 minutes ago, GermanBird said:

 

I won because I have been supporting the England national teams since 2010.

(Never watched a German team live, but watched England several times at Wembley. Haven't watched a German game since 2010 on TV unless they played England)

 

(even my German boss said that I am not allowed into work, if England wins as he can't bear my grinning face)

 

 

Tell him to get lost

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It will only work through gradual progression.

 

Take a successful manager at a top league or national team and move her to the men’s game. Where would she go? EPL teams wouldn’t risk it, nor would championship sides. Below that, it’s a big risk for the women as well as the club. As Emma Hayes implied, why take a step back? If she’s not prepared to take a chance at a lower level, she’ll never get a chance to replicate her success in the women’s game in the men’s.

 

For it to work, the trail blazers have to start at the bottom. Any of yesterday’s team that are at the end of their careers (Bright, Scott, White?) could get their coaching badges with their current club (I’m assuming that they all play for the big six clubs) though working in the academy. This, if they’re any good, would allow progression to U23 and 1st team assistant. It would help that some players would progress along side the coach. Having reached assistant level in the men’s game, manager opportunities would open up. 
 

Dropping a woman into a top job in the men’s game would calamitous. And I can’t see any club at any level giving a managers job to a female ex-player without previous coaching experience. So it’s the long slow route and another 10 years or more before we’ll see a female first team coach in the top divisions.

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6 minutes ago, Tamworthowl said:

It will only work through gradual progression.

 

Take a successful manager at a top league or national team and move her to the men’s game. Where would she go? EPL teams wouldn’t risk it, nor would championship sides. Below that, it’s a big risk for the women as well as the club. As Emma Hayes implied, why take a step back? If she’s not prepared to take a chance at a lower level, she’ll never get a chance to replicate her success in the women’s game in the men’s game.

Or she wouldn't have the same advantages.

 

 

As for the rest, I agree with the slow route, nut with lower leafue teams first or it will be seen as tokenism if they go straight in at the epl.

 

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Surely being England [or any successful International team] Manager is the pinnacle in either gendered form of the sport?

 

Why a female would drop from being the top to have to prove themselves all over again is beyond me. That would seem tokenistic.

 

For me, if a female chose to coach, to manage, to do badges, mentor work, etc. all exclusively whilst being part of the male game, it would probably offer the most viable route to "acceptance."

 

That, I feel, is definitely achievable.

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2 hours ago, Tamworthowl said:

It will only work through gradual progression.

 

Take a successful manager at a top league or national team and move her to the men’s game. Where would she go? EPL teams wouldn’t risk it, nor would championship sides. Below that, it’s a big risk for the women as well as the club. As Emma Hayes implied, why take a step back? If she’s not prepared to take a chance at a lower level, she’ll never get a chance to replicate her success in the women’s game in the men’s.

 

For it to work, the trail blazers have to start at the bottom. Any of yesterday’s team that are at the end of their careers (Bright, Scott, White?) could get their coaching badges with their current club (I’m assuming that they all play for the big six clubs) though working in the academy. This, if they’re any good, would allow progression to U23 and 1st team assistant. It would help that some players would progress along side the coach. Having reached assistant level in the men’s game, manager opportunities would open up. 
 

Dropping a woman into a top job in the men’s game would calamitous. And I can’t see any club at any level giving a managers job to a female ex-player without previous coaching experience. So it’s the long slow route and another 10 years or more before we’ll see a female first team coach in the top divisions.

Totally agree with this.

As mens and womens football are so far apart in terms of investment/infrastructure etc, the roles just don't replicate what they (along with male managers of womens teams) would face.

 

 

Gaining that experience in the mens game within coaching roles etc for me would bridge that gap. Would experience the differences between the mens and womens game (i.e. money factors, enormous egos, culture throughout mens football dressing rooms) and be much more ready to take the step thereafter. 

 

You only have to look at the reluctance bigger clubs already have giving jobs to managers who haven't already made a step up to those levels, dealt with big transfer dealings etc. 

 

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5 minutes ago, WhiteOwl91 said:

Totally agree with this.

As mens and womens football are so far apart in terms of investment/infrastructure etc, the roles just don't replicate what they (along with male managers of womens teams) would face.

 

 

Gaining that experience in the mens game within coaching roles etc for me would bridge that gap. Would experience the differences between the mens and womens game (i.e. money factors, enormous egos, culture throughout mens football dressing rooms) and be much more ready to take the step thereafter. 

 

You only have to look at the reluctance bigger clubs already have giving jobs to managers who haven't already made a step up to those levels, dealt with big transfer dealings etc. 

 

And before anyone comments, thats not meaning anything ridiculous like 'women arent capable of figuring those differences out and making it work.' 

 

But what i do mean is, what football club in this century is going to give them the time to do that learning and gain experience on the job (that job being head coach/manager) in such a results/money driven business? 

 

Managers barely get the grace of a couple of losses strung together before they're under fire with calls for them to be sacked as it is. 

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5 hours ago, MallorcaOwl said:

It worked the other way around, when traditionaly men managed womens teams

 

I know there was men involved with women's football but I honestly cannot comment at how successful it has been. The only situation I could give you without researching is Phil Neville and England.

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7 hours ago, HopefulOwl said:

 

Alot of teams in the mens game have female staff on their books working as physios so how is it different should the manager be female. And as said, some of the womens teams have men and the staff some of whom are the manager.

 

Physio and manager is a completely different role with a completely different set of responsibilities. 

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Wasn’t it the Chelsea women’s manager who said the Wimbledon (mens) job would be a step down. With that attitude, it’ll be a long time before we see a woman manager in the mens game. 
 

Are there any in non-league football ? Serious question. 
 

Are there any women assistant coaches in the mens game other than physios? 
 

I expect some club will give it a go at some point, but in the top 2 or 3 divisions it’s about as likely as Melchester winning the premier league for real. 
 

 

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