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Just found this about Sheffield


darra
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It describes a bit about how Sheffield was back in the day.

 

Long but an interesting piece of history. 

Cardinal Thomas Wolsey arrived at Sheffield’s Manor Lodge on November 8, 1530, he was both tired and fearful for his future. Henry VIII’s erstwhile first minister had been arrested four days beforehand at his bishopric near York. He was to be transported to London on charges of high treason and was under no illusions about the fate that awaited him in the capital.
As Chancellor, Wolsey had been the second most powerful man in the land. Such was his authority in the 1510s and 20s that he was often named ‘alter rex’ or ‘other king’. As well as overseeing the church in England, the cardinal also exercised huge power over foreign policy, writing peace treaties and facilitating Henry’s wars. But successfully challenging the might of Rome over the king’s marriage had proved beyond even his great powers.
Wolsey had fallen out of favour after failing to negotiate an annulment of Henry’s marriage to his first wife Catherine of Aragon. The king needed the annulment so he could marry Anne Boleyn, but the Pope ruled that the decision was his to make, not England’s. Anne was furious and blamed the cardinal. The failure to secure the annulment led to him being arrested and stripped of his government role in 1529. But he was allowed to remain Archbishop of York and later that year travelled to Yorkshire for the first time in his career.

Historians disagree over whether the charges of high treason were trumped up by an angry Henry or well-founded allegations over a foreign plot. What is not in doubt is that in late 1530, he was visited by Henry Percy, the sixth Earl of Northumberland, and ordered to return to London to face a trial. 
Wolsey set off by mule from Cawood in North Yorkshire accompanied by a huge entourage, making his way first to Pontefract and then to Doncaster. His escorts had hoped to keep his arrival in the town quiet by arriving under cover of darkness. But crowds still lined the streets with candles, some shouting ‘God Save Your Grace’ as the procession rode through the town.
After just one night in Doncaster, Wolsey was taken to ‘Sheffield Park’, where he would stay for the next 18 days. His time at Manor Lodge is chronicled in astonishing detail by George Cavendish, the cardinal’s gentleman usher, in his book The Life of Wolsey. From his account we know both how his master lived at the lodge and how the illness that ultimately killed him first manifested itself.

Manor Lodge commanded a lofty position above the deer park.
Sheffield’s Manor Lodge is now more famous as the palatial prison of Mary Queen of Scots, who Elizabeth I had imprisoned there for 14 years from 1570. Wolsey’s time there on the other hand has received less attention, but is just as significant. Indeed but for the cardinal’s insistence on continuing his journey to London to clear his name, Wolsey may have even been buried there.
The history of the building stretches back to the 12th century, when a small hunting lodge was built in the middle of a massive deer park owned by the Lords of Hallamshire. The park itself predates the Norman Conquest of 1066 and was one of the largest in England, its 2,500 acres stretching from what is now the city centre to Darnall and Handsworth. The hunting lodge’s lofty position high above the park was chosen for the commanding views it gave over the entire area.
Sheffield in Tudor times was a town of just 1,500 people. The only two stone buildings were the castle and the church with the rest of the houses being made of wood. Many of these so-called ‘hovels’ had cutlery workshops attached and space for livestock. The town stretched from Holly Street in the west to Lady’s Bridge in the east, and West Bar in the north to Fargate and Barker’s Pool in the south. Beyond that it was just fields until you reached even smaller places like Heeley and Beauchief.

Edited by darra
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Sheffield in Tudor times was a town of just 1,500 people. The only two stone buildings were the castle and the church with the rest of the houses being made of wood. Many of these so-called ‘hovels’ had cutlery workshops attached and space for livestock.

 

not much different to now then

 

Sheffield doesn't make enough of The Manor and Mary QoS imprisonment there. Shame really. Missed a good tourist trap

 

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