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Yorkshire banned from holding test matchs


Geedee
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I didn't watch the whole Parliamentary Session with Rafiq, but I watched about 80% and I was disappointed with the conduct of the MPs. While as a whistle-blower they should have adopted a sympathetic tone, their role is also to question and interrogate too. While I've not seen the Yorkshire report, from what has come out it seems the lawyers investigating found most of Rafiq's claims were either unproven or not true.

 

Rafiq gave evidence based on bullying and harassment, some with racial undertones. So it was very relevant to the enquiry to ask Rafiq if he had bullied or harassed people too? Had he made comments with racial undertones? Had he lied to management? They completely failed to do this.

 

It would have strengthened Rafiq's case now if they had asked him (before these tweets and stories started to emerge) and he had said yes, I was a bully, I harassed people, I lied to my bosses at times about my conduct. This doesn't detract from racism and you can't excuse racism simply because someone isn't very nice. But if the MPs had asked him and he had denied acting like this, then we could form a better view of how credible a witness he is. By not asking him at all it was dereliction of duty.

 

Yorkshire ignored Rafiq's complaints. Rafiq says this is down to institutional racism. Yorkshire employees seemingly regarded Rafiq as a bully, a liar and someone who regularly broke the organisations rules. So they didn't regard him as a credible witness. It seems in a rush to judgement on Yorkshire this aspect of the story has been ignored. They might have had very good reasons for doubting his evidence.

 

Because when it comes down to it - this whole story rests on Rafiq's testimony. And if the things he said simply aren't true then where does that leave us? 

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I read through the testimony that Rafiq submitted to the committee that was published by DCMS. There is a thread running through his evidence that he was treated differently to other players and denied opportunities because of his race.

 

But if you've every read any cricketing autobiography, this is a common theme that the protagonist was denied the chances they deserved due to the management. You could pick the whitest, most-establishment, cricketing figure like say Derek Pringle or David Gower and they give loads of examples, in their opinion, about how they were discriminated against, denied the opportunities they deserved, persecuted, etc.

 

It seems to me like you could make an opposite case that Rafiq was indulged, given countless chances, a County Cap, etc, despite mediocre performances for Yorkshire and (seemingly) lots of off-field behaviours that would have left Yorkshire within their rights to sack him, as opposed to simply not renewing his contract.

 

What seems to be proven is there was a lot of racist name calling in the dressing room. Some of it directed at Rafiq, but some of it by Rafiq and directed at other races (and the social media posts that have emerged are likely to be the tip of the iceberg - if that is what he's willing to publish on a website, what is he like in private?).

 

The Yorkshire management should have stamped this out. And if Yorkshire permitted open use of the p-word in the dressing room, if Moxon and Gale were in the room and didn't do anything to stamp out then I don't see how they can continue in their jobs. But I don't think Rafiq should have been given a £200k payout if he was part of this culture. You can't whistle-blow on yourself and receive compensation for the racism that you have been perpetuating.

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9 hours ago, Emerson Thome said:

I didn't watch the whole Parliamentary Session with Rafiq, but I watched about 80% and I was disappointed with the conduct of the MPs. While as a whistle-blower they should have adopted a sympathetic tone, their role is also to question and interrogate too. While I've not seen the Yorkshire report, from what has come out it seems the lawyers investigating found most of Rafiq's claims were either unproven or not true.

 

Rafiq gave evidence based on bullying and harassment, some with racial undertones. So it was very relevant to the enquiry to ask Rafiq if he had bullied or harassed people too? Had he made comments with racial undertones? Had he lied to management? They completely failed to do this.

 

It would have strengthened Rafiq's case now if they had asked him (before these tweets and stories started to emerge) and he had said yes, I was a bully, I harassed people, I lied to my bosses at times about my conduct. This doesn't detract from racism and you can't excuse racism simply because someone isn't very nice. But if the MPs had asked him and he had denied acting like this, then we could form a better view of how credible a witness he is. By not asking him at all it was dereliction of duty.

 

Yorkshire ignored Rafiq's complaints. Rafiq says this is down to institutional racism. Yorkshire employees seemingly regarded Rafiq as a bully, a liar and someone who regularly broke the organisations rules. So they didn't regard him as a credible witness. It seems in a rush to judgement on Yorkshire this aspect of the story has been ignored. They might have had very good reasons for doubting his evidence.

 

Because when it comes down to it - this whole story rests on Rafiq's testimony. And if the things he said simply aren't true then where does that leave us? 

I get what you're saying but if they had gone down the route of asking Rafiq about any past misdemeanours people would start asking "who's on trial here the player or the club?" Maybe it was a missed opportunity by Rafiq to say "look I'll admit I've made mistakes in the past"

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Yorkshire County Cricket Club today announces the appointment of Darren Gough as Managing Director of Yorkshire Cricket on an interim basis, initially until the conclusion of the 2022 season #OneRose

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