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Council work damaged Sheffield WW1 site


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7 hours ago, Neal M said:

My favorite story from the tail end of WWII involves Canadian Paras squaring up to the Soviets at Wismar. The Soviets had been granted Wismar at the Yalta conference (and would ultimately take control of the city on late ‘45), but in May 45 but Churchill feared that if Wismar was given away too soon, it would allow the Soviets a pathway to invade Denmark.

 

So just 1 battalion of Canadian paratroopers raced to the town. When the Soviets arrived they found the Canadians and believed the bluff that the Canadians were backed by artillery and USAAF bombers and that they were prepared to go to war.

 

The much larger Soviet force backed down, and Denmark was saved.

 

 

You know what, in their desperate attempts to make Canada appear relevant, the media here is always pushing how Vimy Ridge was a great Canadian victory (it was the Newfoundland regiment as it happens and N'land didn't become a Province of Canada until 1949, so Vimy shouldn't apply. And there's D-Day and liberating Holland single-handedly

 

But they've never mentioned this much more fascinating and important saving of Denmark

 

 

P.S. Have I mentioned I've been to Yalta and in the exact spot of the conference?

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Very Meditteranean, being on the Black Sea as it is.

 

It was hot when we were there

 

It's interesting to see Livadia and the Russian attempt to present it as a museum. Very basic, really. Some info signs and photos of the conference. It didn't strike as a celebrated place. There's large gardens outside and access to the beach and sea

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11 hours ago, Neal M said:

Another lesser known tale from the end of WW2.

 

When the German Wehrmacht and the US Army fought side by side against the SS.

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-32622651.amp

 

I've stumbled across this YT video and have never heard the story before.  Going off on a tangent but thought it might interest a few on here.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Inspector Lestrade said:

 

I've stumbled across this YT video and have never heard the story before.  Going off on a tangent but thought it might interest a few on here.

 

 

Never heard that story before. Great bit of history that! 

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1 minute ago, Sambo89 said:

Never heard that story before. Great bit of history that! 

 

Watched a couple more videos which give a bit more detail.  

 

It reminded me of a story line in Goodnight Night Sweetheart, when I've watched it thought it wasn't realistic but now makes me wonder if the writer was aware of this event.

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1 minute ago, Inspector Lestrade said:

 

Watched a couple more videos which give a bit more detail.  

 

It reminded me of a story line in Goodnight Night Sweetheart, when I've watched it thought it wasn't realistic but now makes me wonder if the writer was aware of this event.

Could well be the case, doesn't always get the credit it deserves, goodnight sweetheart. Used to love it!

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1 minute ago, @owlstalk said:

Where is this prisoner of war camp exactly?
Is there anything to see?

 

Near Sportsman. 

 

Mostly is floor level footings and brickworks. 

 

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Just a bloke. Being dragged along in a world that moves too quick for it's own good.

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World War One[edit]

Redmires Camp was first used in World War I. Originally it was set up as a First World War training camp for the Sheffield City Battalion, who trained in the area around Redmires Reservoir.[1] Archaeological surveys of the nearby training areas, including trench systems dug by the trainee soldiers were undertaken between 1999 and 2006,[2] but no investigations have been made of the camp. When the Sheffield City Battalion went overseas, the camp and training areas were used by other British military units.[1] It subsequently became a prisoner of war camp. Its most famous inmate was the future Admiral Karl Dönitz who had been commanding a U-boat when captured on 4 October 1918.[3]

Inter-war Period[edit]

In 1925, a severe outbreak of smallpox meant that nearby Lodge Moor Hospital was unable to house all the patients, and Redmires Camp was used as an auxiliary hospital. It remained in use as such until 1935.[4]

World War Two[edit]

At the beginning of World War II, the name of Redmires Camp was changed to Lodge Moor Camp, becoming Prisoner of War Camp 17.[1] The camp housed Italian POWs who established a friendly rapport with the locals. As the war progressed they were replaced by German prisoners who endured overcrowding; the International Committee of the Red Cross, which, described the conditions as “insufficient/uninhabitable”. A witness suggested there were more than 70 prisoners in huts designed for 30. Others were in tents.[3]

Murder[edit]

On 24 March 1945 Gerhardt Rettig, a German prisoner of war, was severely beaten by fellow German prisoners of war, and later died of his injuries in hospital. Two men were subsequently tried for his murder and executed.[5]

Current Condition and Uses[edit]

Many of the concrete bases for the Nissen huts remain, along with remains of toilet blocks and emergency water storage tanks.[6] However, apart from the concrete bases, the area is now overgrown with trees, bracken and brambles, and used mainly by dog walkers. It is signposted as Redmires Camp Plantation and owned by Sheffield City Council.[7]

In 1979, a small part of the area was cleared to make a permanent site for Travellers,[8] which is still in use today.[9]

Archeology students from the University of Sheffield, working with the Sheffield Lakeland Landscape Partnership (SLLP), undertook new searches of the World War Two camp remains in the Summer of 2019.[10] In April 2021 visitors to the site reported that Sheffield City Council workers, clearing trees from the site, had damaged concrete bases of the prisoners' accommodation, broke one of the toilet blocks and crushed the remains of sewage pipes.[11] The site is protected as a Scheduled Monument.[1]

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Owlstalk Shop

 

 

 

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9 minutes ago, @owlstalk said:

World War One[edit]

Redmires Camp was first used in World War I. Originally it was set up as a First World War training camp for the Sheffield City Battalion, who trained in the area around Redmires Reservoir.[1] Archaeological surveys of the nearby training areas, including trench systems dug by the trainee soldiers were undertaken between 1999 and 2006,[2] but no investigations have been made of the camp. When the Sheffield City Battalion went overseas, the camp and training areas were used by other British military units.[1] It subsequently became a prisoner of war camp. Its most famous inmate was the future Admiral Karl Dönitz who had been commanding a U-boat when captured on 4 October 1918.[3]

Inter-war Period[edit]

In 1925, a severe outbreak of smallpox meant that nearby Lodge Moor Hospital was unable to house all the patients, and Redmires Camp was used as an auxiliary hospital. It remained in use as such until 1935.[4]

World War Two[edit]

At the beginning of World War II, the name of Redmires Camp was changed to Lodge Moor Camp, becoming Prisoner of War Camp 17.[1] The camp housed Italian POWs who established a friendly rapport with the locals. As the war progressed they were replaced by German prisoners who endured overcrowding; the International Committee of the Red Cross, which, described the conditions as “insufficient/uninhabitable”. A witness suggested there were more than 70 prisoners in huts designed for 30. Others were in tents.[3]

Murder[edit]

On 24 March 1945 Gerhardt Rettig, a German prisoner of war, was severely beaten by fellow German prisoners of war, and later died of his injuries in hospital. Two men were subsequently tried for his murder and executed.[5]

Current Condition and Uses[edit]

Many of the concrete bases for the Nissen huts remain, along with remains of toilet blocks and emergency water storage tanks.[6] However, apart from the concrete bases, the area is now overgrown with trees, bracken and brambles, and used mainly by dog walkers. It is signposted as Redmires Camp Plantation and owned by Sheffield City Council.[7]

In 1979, a small part of the area was cleared to make a permanent site for Travellers,[8] which is still in use today.[9]

Archeology students from the University of Sheffield, working with the Sheffield Lakeland Landscape Partnership (SLLP), undertook new searches of the World War Two camp remains in the Summer of 2019.[10] In April 2021 visitors to the site reported that Sheffield City Council workers, clearing trees from the site, had damaged concrete bases of the prisoners' accommodation, broke one of the toilet blocks and crushed the remains of sewage pipes.[11] The site is protected as a Scheduled Monument.[1]

 

Sheffield Battalion were walked directly into German machine gun fire and every single one of them died.

 

 

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Just a bloke. Being dragged along in a world that moves too quick for it's own good.

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1 hour ago, Errol Flashman said:

 

Sheffield Battalion were walked directly into German machine gun fire and every single one of them died.

 

 


Not every one, but the battalion did suffer huge casualties. Over 500 (out of around 1,100) were killed, invalided or missing during that initial attack at the Somme. More died as that battle progressed.

 

The Music Hall act “Stainless Stephen” was one of the survivors. 

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The owls are not what they seem.

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