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Martin Keown on TalkSPORT yesterday made some  interesting points. Said towards the end of his career he would get headaches & double vision during games which he now feared were symptoms of longer term issues relating to heading the ball. 
Also mentioned that although the balls were nowadays much lighter than they used to be, getting his head on the end of it at 70mph still rattled him down to his boots.

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4 minutes ago, @owlstalk said:

 

 

I think that basically sums up this thread


Doesn't matter if people get brain damage, dementia, die etc so long as straight middle aged white men don't have something taken away from them 

 

lol

 

 

I happen to be a young black jewish man gendering in to a chinese white female and resent you stereotyping me on your assumptions.

 

I demand you resign forthwith.

 

lol 

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1 minute ago, Yellowbelly said:

Martin Keown on TalkSPORT yesterday made some  interesting points. Said towards the end of his career he would get headaches & double vision during games which he now feared were symptoms of longer term issues relating to heading the ball. 
Also mentioned that although the balls were nowadays much lighter than they used to be, getting his head on the end of it at 70mph still rattled him down to his boots.

 

Nothing to with hard living the Arsenal players partook in outside of football?  

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2 minutes ago, Inspector Lestrade said:

 

Nothing to with hard living the Arsenal players partook in outside of football?  

No I think it was more to do with being repeatedly hit in the head by a resistant object at 70mph

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3 minutes ago, the monk said:

Who are ?

 

Well, obviously not the various governing bodies throughout boxing, but the pressure would and has come from elsewhere such as the government via medical professionals etc.

 

Still, this pressure's been around for many years anyway and boxing's still popular enough.

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Just now, Yellowbelly said:

No I think it was more to do with being repeatedly hit in the head by a resistant object at 70mph

 

How do you know that was the cause though?  Have all other causes been ruled out?

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I think, given the evidence, it’s wise to restrict heading drills, especially for the younger players. The way the game is developing, has probably negated the need for an outright ban on heading. That development hasn’t come about through concerns over players well-being, but more a realisation that the aerial ploy is such a limited approach to scoring a goal. If the consequences of that mean less heading of the ball, than that’s turned out to be a blessing in disguise

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1 hour ago, owls-swfc said:

There is obviously a link to dementia and heading a football (similar to what you might expect in boxing)... However, the players in the 50s and sixties were playing with totally different (bigger and heavier) balls, that got heavier throughout a match if saturated with rainwater..... Today's balls a smaller and lighter and don't absorb water... You would expect a lower risk of long term damage although still a risk of course. 

This ^^^100%

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1 minute ago, Inspector Lestrade said:

 

How do you know that was the cause though?  Have all other causes been ruled out?

And that’s why there’s going to be an investigation into the matter.

 

However, if it’s about player safety, especially in kids football, surely the most intelligent route of thought would be if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck etc....

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1 minute ago, @owlstalk said:

 

 

I think that basically sums up this thread


Doesn't matter if people get brain damage, dementia, die etc so long as straight middle aged white men don't have something taken away from them 

 

lol

 

NASTY. I am a straight, white, old-aged man who loves Football. I want to watch football to my dying day, and am at the age now where , almost daily, people of my own age, and people I knew and loved, are dying around me. Its not a pleasant feeling, especially having lost only this week a brother-in-Law, Wednesday to his dying day. What i am disputing is that heading leads to dementia.I am not saying it isn't a contributary cause, what i'm saying is that there are many more factors to take into account, not the least of which is following this website.👨‍🦼

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1 hour ago, @owlstalk said:

Newcastle United manager Steve Bruce says there is "genuine concern" about a possible link between heading in football and dementia.

 

The players' union, the Professional Footballers' Association, is creating a taskforce to further examine the issue of brain injury diseases in football.

The move follows the recent death of Nobby Stiles, and dementia diagnosis of Sir Bobby Charlton.

 

"If there is a link we have to find it quickly and a solution," said Bruce.

 

"The PFA must look into it. If there is a risk, and certainly evidence is pointing towards that, we have the ability to do something.

"Young kids - take away heading of the ball, it's an art itself, and a dying art, and I'm all for doing the research we can and doing something about it."

 

West Ham boss David Moyes is keen on players from his generation receiving regular checks so any diagnosis can be made as early as possible.

"I am concerned because I want to make sure going forward everything is going to be OK," said Moyes.

 

"If there was a way to be monitored or screened that would be really important. Everyone would see it as a good way to go forward."

On Thursday, West Brom boss Slaven Bilic said heading footballs in training should be stopped if it was proven to be linked to dementia.

 

World Cup winner Sir Geoff Hurst said heading in training was "probably more detrimental" to players than in games.

"What solution they are going to find, I don't know," said Bilic.

 

"If they find out through the research that heading the ball 10 times during training is going to cause you dementia, then let's stop it.

"For me, the great thing is they are talking about it and recognising it."

 

A report published in 2019 found that ex-professional footballers are three and a half times more likely than the general population to die of dementia.

The introduction of a taskforce comes amid criticism from the family of Hurst's 1966 World Cup-winning England team-mate Nobby Stiles.

Stiles' family said football needs to "address the scandal" of dementia in football.

The ex-Manchester United and England midfielder died in October, aged 78, after suffering from dementia and prostate cancer.

 

Sir Bobby Charlton, 83, has also been diagnosed with dementia - making him the fifth member of England's World Cup-winning squad to have been diagnosed with a brain injury syndrome.

At 83 it’s hard to link Bobby Charlton to football, as there are thousands suffering from Dementia at that age.

Needs to be more detailed studies and more evidence for me. Maybe scale back in junior football while their brains are still developing, but once they sign a professional contract that’s the players personal choice and therefore accepting the risks. 

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Just now, Yellowbelly said:

And that’s why there’s going to be an investigation into the matter.

 

However, if it’s about player safety, especially in kids football, surely the most intelligent route of thought would be if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck etc....

 

If there was hundreds or thousands then they might have a case but it seems its only a handful out of the many thousands who play the game. 

 

If we go down this route then we wont be able to anything, ban goalposts as the goalkeeper could dive in to it. 

 

 

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Just now, Willow Owl said:

At 83 it’s hard to link Bobby Charlton to football

 

On his own maybe - if it was an isolated thing


However look at the World Cup winning team of 1966 that he was a part of - and look how many have died from brain damage


 


Owlstalk Shop

 

 

 

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I think the greater impact (no pun intended) on head injuries is from head to head clashes rather than head to ball.

 

Simple lightweight head guards are possibility but top players would probably reject this as they are in up to their necks as far as image and aesthetics go.

 

Light foam skull caps protecting all but the forehead would be of considerable help. 

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Just now, nevthelodgemoorowl said:

I think the greater impact (no pun intended) on head injuries is from head to head clashes rather than head to ball.

 

Simple lightweight head guards are possibility but top players would probably reject this as they are in up to their necks as far as image and aesthetics go.

 

Light foam skull caps protecting all but the forehead would be of considerable help. 

 

 

 

When Llera wore one I was genuinely shocked as it seemed to propel the ball forward way faster and harder when he headed the ball whilst wearing it

 

lol

 


 


Owlstalk Shop

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, gurujuan said:

Most of the top teams have already countered this. The German’s realised this and added a more physical element to their pass and move style, a tactic now deployed by most sides Taller more athletic players are the norm right now, but it hasn’t resulted in more teams taking the aerial route. 
In the Premier League, players are taller than they ever were, with the odd exception. It’s not unusual to see centre backs of 6-4, 6-5 these days, when back in the day, a 6-2 centre half was a colossus Ditto midfielders, it’s not uncommon to have similarly sized midfielders All this means is that teams are better prepared to deal with an aerial attack, and because that way of thinking has now filtered down to the championship, tactics such as those employed by Pulis, will become more obsolete. 

 

That's an interesting take.

 

When you say 'tactics such as those employed by Pulis', what do you mean, though?

 

His Middlesbrough side were 16th in the Championship for headers in 2017-18, and 13th in 2018-19.

 

They were also 21st for accurate long-balls and 17th for inaccurate long-balls in 2018-19 and 15th for accurate long-balls and 20th for inaccurate long-balls in 2018-19.

 

Neither of which suggest that he's the greatest proponent of aerial football this division has to offer.

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