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Round and round and round we go !!

 

Is this a new thread or a re bumped one of the many others saying exactly the same thing over and over again 

 

Please god let us get back in the prem so we can get out of our Tardis  

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20 minutes ago, pazowl55 said:

About right. Maybe slightly higher. But to have a player with no international caps sixth on a list is ridiculous.

 

Any list for the best Premier league players should only include what they did there. International considerations don't really come into it. Di Canio was obviously not considered because he was a borderline lunatic, and had feuds with at least two of the national team coaches, but despite that there was ridiculous competition in the Italy team at that time with the likes of Totti, Baggio, Mancini, Ravanelli, Casiraghi, Vieri, Del Piero etc.

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1 hour ago, The Night-Owl said:

Brilliant and exciting player as was Carbone too but neither had the top class pedigree of Roland Nilsson or Chris Waddle. That said, Italy was blessed at the time with a lot of quality number 10's, neither were close to representing them and they weren't as highly regarded in their home country as they were over here.

 

That's not to take away their excitement and quality as players at the time, they both impacted the Premier League and were exceptional over here but I don't think they were in the same level of pedigree as Roland Nilsson, Chris Waddle and Des Walker, in particular. If they had been international regulars that might have made them a lot harder to sign, even though in the 90s we had quite a lot of international players. It's hard to believe we're still the same club that once had top class players within my lifetime. 


agreed...been a top player is more than just been a good player, it’s about been a top all round professional. Di Canio was an amazing player but he always had the ability to implode. 

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Because he fizzed us over. People seem happy to forget that because he was a good player.

 

The vitriol he got from Wednesday fans on his return with West Ham was probably the worst I've heard. People have short memories. He can do one for me.

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8 minutes ago, amitten said:

Because he fizzed us over. People seem happy to forget that because he was a good player.

 

The vitriol he got from Wednesday fans on his return with West Ham was probably the worst I've heard. People have short memories. He can do one for me.

You obviously missed Big Ron’s return with Villa.

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A truly brilliant footballer. What must he have thought to go from playing alongside great players at Lazio and milan to instead be lining up alongside Wayne Collins, lee briscoe and Andy booth.  he had it all as a player. Quick, direct, skilful , could run all day. Didn’t always fancy it away from home. 

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I should imagine the reason that he didn’t play for his country is that he’s as mad as a box of frogs.

He could probably intimidate and rant at the contents of the home dressing room at S6, but try that with a world famous and highly talented Italian National team and the retribution would be swift and demeaning.

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18 minutes ago, amitten said:

Because he fizzed us over. People seem happy to forget that because he was a good player.

 

The vitriol he got from Wednesday fans on his return with West Ham was probably the worst I've heard. People have short memories. He can do one for me.

 

I won't pretend that Di Canio was a stable, unselfish character, but this is a tremendously one-sided view of what happened. Many of us believe that the club took the opportunity to get rid of what they saw as a disruption and managed the situation so that the player got much of the blame.

 

The chairman and manager had already publicised their feelings before the Alcock pantomime and it's well reported that he had to arrange (and pay?) for his own representation at the subsequent disciplinary hearing. He was advised by the club to return to Italy until the dust had settled and then the media were being told we had no idea where he was, leading to Sky Sports News rather bizarrely following him around his home town demonstrating he was exactly where he'd been told to be. Di Canio also made an offer of clear the air talks which I believe the club dismissed. Eventually, as the board knew was likely, the player took matters into his own hands and could then be blamed with some mindless button pushing about 'disrespecting the shirt' and so forth that the gullible accepted readily.

 

They can't even be defended by saying the club weren't unduly damaged by this strategy either. We lost a prize asset for loose change (repeating the trick a few months later with Carbone) and the decline in results began almost immediately. It was a major stride down the road to where we found ourselves for the next two decades and counting - besieged by debt and well adrift of our former status.

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