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3 hours ago, slow83 said:

I remember going to the cricket probably late 90s and bumped into a big group of Wednesdayites we didn’t know. WAWAW was the greeting, over and over, to the point where it’s all you could hear in the pub, but it was never a song then. It was a saying/ greeting long long ago, that has been around particularly at away games and when meeting fellow Owls around the country/globe. Or to defuse any trouble amongst fellow fans.

 

The song started in the last 10 years or so true but the saying has been around for decades. Barnsley and Leeds have both cringeworthily started using it recently since we started the song, imagine if we started saying MOT - wouldn’t happen would it so I don’t know why they do it.
 

I suppose they do say imitation is the highest form of flattery.

Leeds started the up the football league we go song . Didn't Ricky the Rasta coin the phrase WAWAW?

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3 hours ago, room0035 said:

Its a football thing we had the unknown Italian song then with a season every team in the country was singing.

 

We also coined

 

Andy Pearce, Andy Pearce Andy Andy Pearce

He gets the ball he scores a goal 

Andy Andy Pearce.

 

Then some bloke from Man Utd called Andy Cole scored a load of goals and claimed it was always a song for him.

 

 

Newcastle were singing it before he went to Man U. We sang it as a joke really. 

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5 hours ago, lanzaroteowl said:

It's more a hoolie term used to separate 'us' from 'them' in a pub etc as in "All Wednesday aren't we?" .

Yep...

As far as I know, it started in the Limit nightclub on West St in the late 80's or maybe early 90's.

Where wednesdayites were fighting with..err wednedayites...both thinking the other mob were piggies.

After it calmed down, 'were all wednesday arn't we', was first heard...

Later to become wawaw....etc etc.

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6 hours ago, alanharper said:

Not sure where WAWAW came from but it's certainly fairly recent, nobody ever said it in the 80s or 90s. It's a bit cringey tbh

 

The pigs debate has been done to death but never definitively answered. But only one side of the city resorted to circulating (so often that they came to believe it to be true) completely made up and error-strewn "historical library documents" and Photoshopped old ordnance survey maps to try and prove their side of the argument. And it wasn't us. 

 

WAWAW was used by Wednesday fans to identify each other back in the 80s.  Usually at away games in the pubs.  Used by the more shall we say, boisterous of fans.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Inspector Lestrade said:

 

WAWAW was used by Wednesday fans to identify each other back in the 80s.  Usually at away games in the pubs.  Used by the more shall we say, boisterous of fans.

 

 

Boisterous...  like it 🤣

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6 hours ago, Ellis Rimmer said:

WAWAW comes from here doesn't it? 

 

2 people on here arguing, then get told to calm down because WAWAW

 

Was meant as a joke originally

 

No

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5 hours ago, Jack the Hat said:

The explanation has been given on here a few times. It’s to do with pig iron used in the steelworks. I can’t be bothered to type it all in. Hopefully someone else has the time to fill in the gaps.

Never heard of the steelworks link, although I'm familiar with pig iron. Some of my grandad's brothers were steelworkers and Owls supporters. Wonder why he chose to sell me the bacon story? Family (dis) loyalty?

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5 hours ago, matthefish2002 said:

 

I am sure WAWAW is less than 10 years old.

I cant remember anyone using it when Sturrock / Laws was manager.

 

 



The song itself might only be from around then, though I think it came in being when Carlos was here, but I wouldn't insist on it.

 

The actual saying, goes back to at least the 80s.

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1 hour ago, Gildowl said:

Never heard of the steelworks link, although I'm familiar with pig iron. Some of my grandad's brothers were steelworkers and Owls supporters. Wonder why he chose to sell me the bacon story? Family (dis) loyalty?

There are all sorts  of different theories depends which seems most likely to you. I go for the steelworks one maybe they thought the other.

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4 hours ago, Jack the Hat said:

Not quite. People from Sheffield were known as blades due to the steelwork which was our nickname until moving to owlerton in 1899. When we stopped using bramall Lane 10 years earlier to play at olive grove they started a new club to make up the lost revenue. Wednesday were the big club with united being a big like our reserves. In the steelworks the pig iron guys were less skilled than the steelworkers so had a similar relationship to the steelworkers as us and united - not to do with location of workforce. But you are pretty much right. So by my reckoning in the years from 1867 to when we went to OWLerton 1899 we were the blades and from 1889 to 1899 they were the pigs. 

 

It's not totally to do with location, but the lower skilled workforce did live more centrally, AFAIK, and they were more in United's catchment area, so I am sure it played a part in who they supported.

 

But yes, we were called the Blades and of course, Bramall Lane was our ground until the owners tried to rip us off, and like you said, at that point our cast offs made another team to play there, while we went to Olive Grove before moving to Owlerton where we have been ever since.

 

So as the pigs say, they were forged in steel: pig iron to be precise, which is made from Dross. Also known as Crude Iron, so it's the only accurate thing those simpletons got right.

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On 28/07/2020 at 15:33, ChapSmurf said:

 

This is the reason, and the only reason, we refer to them as pigs. They cannot use the phrase back, but they do.

 

If I have the facts correct, pig iron was made by lower skilled workers, who often came from the inner city and poorer areas. Due to the location of their homes, they often supported Utd., as this was the closest club to them, distance wise. Because of this, they - and they only - were nicknamed "Pigs". "Pigs" should not refer to Wednesday fans at all, but over the years it has been adopted by the idiots across the city.

 

The steel fabricators, who were paid more, who mainly lived outside of the inner city region, tended to support the Owls more, again due to their location. Whilst there were exceptions to this location rule no doubt, the origins of the term "Pig(s)" comes from the steel industry. There is no other explanation and it has nothing to do with not eating bacon sandwiches or the made up story of a pig farm close to the Hillsborough ground.

Good research, the founding members of Wednesday were "little mesters", basically self employed steel workers, good ordinary working class people.

Many people from the city centre were able to travel to watch Wednesday even after the move to Owlerton however those that weren't diehard Wednesday fans at the time found it easier to watch United as it was closer to the city centre. 

I've got no idea where this myth of Wednesday being 'middle class' has come from, the market traders history is made up as well.

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On 28/07/2020 at 19:28, sherlyegg said:

Yep...

As far as I know, it started in the Limit nightclub on West St in the late 80's or maybe early 90's.

Where wednesdayites were fighting with..err wednedayites...both thinking the other mob were piggies.

After it calmed down, 'were all wednesday arn't we', was first heard...

Later to become wawaw....etc etc.

It started in London in the 70's when we used to go in the Dolphin and couldn't work out how many West Ham or Millwall were in early

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2 minutes ago, daveyboy66 said:

It started in London in the 70's when we used to go in the Dolphin and couldn't work out how many West Ham or Millwall were in early

Really, don't remember that and never missed in them days. Though there was quite a few different mobs...first time I ever heard was deffo 80's or early 90's. But could easily have been before..

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