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tom

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  • Birthday 09/10/1990

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  1. Sounds like Corbyn National team plays in red
  2. Really interesting stuff - thanks for this mate.
  3. Generally not, no. Sheffield has a lot of outdated and in some cases, poorly built office spaces. Businesses generally want flexible spaces that can accommodate different methods and styles of working. A lot of the stuff built in they 70/80s is now becoming obsolete because it was built to reflect the trends at the time - traditional space partitioned into smaller rooms, often with poor lighting. Businesses these days don’t want this kind of environment - for a whole variety of reasons (working/employee culture e.g). A good example was the office space built on the old Limit nightclub - little/no windows and a very outdated architectural style that isn’t aesthetically pleasing or attractive to prospective businesses. It was knocked down in 2015/6 (yet had only been built twenty-ish years prior) for student flats, as the layout was basically unusable for anything else. This isn’t anybody’s fault per se, but was more reflective of how we perceived office space to look/feel at the time. Also office space is a little bit different to housing, in that there is normally a much greater availability - each business has different needs and most of the time, a big business will not occupy one building alone and could be home to different tenants. In CN tower (lol) - they’re advocating what business users want: big windows, open-planned spaces and a zero carbon footprint. By building these kind of developments, we can try to attract businesses from elsewhere in the U.K. or from around the world (idealistic, but that’s the basic idea).
  4. GB win their first regular time game in the top tier since 1962 with a 4-3 win against Belarus. Big congratulations to GB and an incredibly proud moment for all British hockey fans.
  5. It’s a privately funded development and looks a whole lot better than it’s current land use. Despite the whole WFH trend due to COVID, Sheffield still lacks high-quality grade A office space and this (encouragingly) shows there is demand which is good for the city. As you don’t like it, how should we use that space then? Because your previous post doesn’t seem to address that. It currently looks like this:
  6. Cracking little development - this and Midcity house will really give That bit of Sheffield a big city feel.
  7. To bring the thread back on topic.. I don’t agree with Anais’ comments - we have a very small city centre compared to that of cities similarly sized (Liverpool, Leeds etc). Retail isn’t exactly dead either.. but we need to rethink how we utilise those spaces and add developments that can adapt to future uses. I do agree on the jobs part - but this is a situation not unique to Sheffield and bar Manchester and maybe Birmingham, we’re struggling to attract high level jobs to the city for a plethora of different reasons (e.g. Channel 4 chose not to be based in Sheffield due to low educational levels - which I don’t really agree/understand with, given they decided to be based in Leeds). The big question is why - which is very complex question and I don’t think it’s just a case of blaming a particular party or group of people. Personally I think Dan Jarvis is an awful Mayor and Dore is also a crap mayor, but there’s not been a half decent alternative and none of the other parties have offered much either. But a conservative government in a very red city will not help (look at all those gov jobs moving elsewhere.. Sheffield not even in discussions). But I don’t think Labour helped much either. We also have crap transport links (railways and airports), Despite Sheffield having the highest rate of students staying in Sheffield post-graduation. Is the city better than what it was before? In some areas yes, other areas are lacking in others. However the private investment going into Sheffield at the minute seems better than pre-2008 levels - lots of things going on and I’m becoming more excited if 9/10s of these projects come off - as the city centre will look immensely different within the next five years.
  8. Anybody been watching? GB playing once in the top level - so playing against NHL/KHL players. Britain lost against Russia 7-1 in the first game and currently 2-1 down against Slovakia in the final period. On Freesports for anybody wanting to watch.
  9. Maybe worth having a read through Camra’s Sheffield website? Camra pubs - Sheffield Most of those pubs will be child-free and will have the experience you are looking for.
  10. Think it’s just a sign of the times with the Arena. It’s nearly 35 years old since conception - the whole concept of arenas was new to Britain when it was first built. New one would be ace - ideally bigger than the Leeds one, as it’d drive them absolutely nuts
  11. If this thread shows, we should request international funding and turn it into the “Sheffield Historical Institute of the Times”. It’ll be for everybody who doesn’t want to look forward into the future. We can include... - Greasy spoon cafes that cost 50p for a full English (subsided by council parking fees ofc) - The Julie Dore Echo Chamber of Council Criticism - A live real time huge screen that displays what shops Leeds/Manchester have and Sheffield doesn’t. - Trade motor association stand of driving young people round the bend - Real that doesn’t serve food and with real prices - Free car parking Bonus power going off three days a week to make it feel like the olden days
  12. Absolutely hit the nail on the head. I’ll refer to this video: Sheffield: A City on the Move This is a great example of Sheffield and SCC trying to be progressive and modernising. The problem is (and always has been) that urban development is a gamble, capitalising on current trends and predicting future ones. Look how spectacularly wrong some of those projects went - but is that the council’s fault? As I said in a previous thread - traditional retail is dying a horrible, slow death. British Land & Meadowhall know this - hence all expansion plans are leisure, F&B related. No mention of additional sqf for more retail. The best thing to happen in the last decade was Hammerson (the original NRQ - so the predecessor of the current HOTC2 project) bailing out on a massive indoor retail centre. This would have been the final nail in the coffin for Sheffield city centre. After spending three years in Hull, their response to a declining city centre was to open up another after another indoor retail centre - three centres later that are now like ghost towns and because of their usage, they would struggle to get repurposed as something else. Leaving them with numerous white elephants and no use for them. This would have happened with the Sevenstone project and unless British Land get their ideas together quickly, will happen to Meadowhall too. The problem is that JL’s closure is another symptom of two wider topics in play: - The lack of high-wealth jobs created in the SCR post steel/pit closures of the 70’s and 80’s and the inability to bring in office-based employment in a city the size of Sheffield. - An ever-increasing online society - the internet forcing rapid, irreversible and drastic changes to the traditional way of life. The problem is how do we get around this? This is the big question to ask, not whether Sheffield city centre is easy to drive into or whether you want a Peruvian coffee for a fiver. They’re big red herrings and not reflective of the wider issues at play.
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